Office of Technology Transfer – University of Michigan

Smart dental composite material utilizing thiol–ene polymerization mechanism to reduce resin shrinkage.

Technology #6131

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Researchers
Brian Clarkson
Managed By
Tiefei Dong
Senior Licensing Specialist, Life Sciences 734-763-5332
Patent Protection
US Patent Pending 2017-0172854

According to the U.S Census Bureau, in 2010 nearly 36 million people age of 65 and over lived in the United States, accounting for just over 12% of the total population. Oral diseases and conditions are common among these Americans who grew up without the benefit of community water fluoridation and other fluoride products. The older population in 2030 is projected to be twice as large as in 2000, growing from 35 million to 71.5 million and representing nearly 20% of the total U.S. population. Government analysts reported total dental spending increased from $91.5 billion in 2006 to $96.9 billion in 2007, which is roughly the annual growth rate projected through 2017. Beyond 2017 the rate is expected to exceed 6 percent. Oral health is an important and often overlooked component of an older person’s general health and well-being. Oral health problems can cause pain and suffering as well as difficulty in speaking, chewing, and swallowing.

Smart dental composite material utilizing thiol–ene polymerization mechanism to reduce resin shrinkage.

Researchers at the University of Michigan Dental School have developed a novel technology utilizes the radical-mediated, step-growth, thiol–ene polymerization mechanism, in conjunction with stress relaxation using network topology reconfiguration and molecular stress sensors to afford a polymeric resin. This technology also takes advantage of synthetic fluorapatite crystals in the thiol–ene resin as a discontinuous filler. This technology has application in several cell types including gingival epithelial cells, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and osteoblast-like cells.

Applications

  • Novel technology that is used for resilient and robust fillers in dental composite restoration
  • Use biocompatible fluorapatite filler in polymers that can be used as a lining material, bonding agent and sealant
  • Use biocompatible fluorapatite for research on gingival epithelial cells, dental pulp stem cells and osteoblast-like cells
  • Use in orthopedic and cardiovascular applications

Advantages

  • Smart dental composite that is more effective in reducing resin shrinkage stress by utilizing thiol–ene polymerization mechanism
  • This technology utilized synthetic biomimetic fluorapatite enamel crystals that is biocompatiable with several cell types